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front foot defensive shot in cricket

How to Play Front Foot Defense


Front foot defense is by far the most important shot in cricket. Cause it helps you defend the good balls and survive for the bad ones to put away later.
Its made up of three simple steps.
Step 1.
Bat lift
Step 2.
Step forward with your front foot covering the line of the ball with your front foot.
Step 3.
Bring the bat down in line of the ball to make contact with the ball leaving no gap between the bat and pad.
Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.


                                                      


how to play front foot drive

How to Play Front Foot Drive

how to play front foot drive

how to play front foot drive

Drive is again an extension of the front foot defense. So the rules and steps of front foot defense apply as it is to this shot as well.
Step 1.
Bat lift
Step 2.
Step forward with your front foot covering the line of the ball with your front foot.
Step 3.
Bring the bat down forcefully in line of the ball to make contact with the ball leaving no gap between the bat and pad. End the shot resting the bat just above your shoulder.
Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.




how to play step and drive

How to Play Step and Drive

how to play step and drive

how to play step and drive

This is front foot drive played by coming down the wicket to meet a shorter pitched ball in a drivable length ie half volley. Its an aggressive shot and risky shot to play against a spinning ball.
Most important thing while playing this shot is to get to the pitch of the ball so that you do not let the ball to spin away and miss the bat to get stumped.
Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.



how to play front foot glance

How to Play Front Foot Glance

how to play front foot glance

how to play front foot glance

 

This shot is just an extension of the Front Foot Defense

The front foot glance is more a deflection rather than a stroke because it relies mostly on the pace of the ball.

The placement comes from a flick of the wrists at the moment of impact, so the bat face is angled rather than straight.

Make sure your head is over the ball, with your weight on your front foot.

This will keep the ball on the ground, rather than flying dangerously in the air.

Step 1

Bat Lift

 

Step 2.
Step forward with your front foot in line of the ball.

 

Step 3

Bring the bat down as straight as possible, turning the face of the bat slightly towards the leg side and making contact with the ball in front of the front pad.


 


how to play back foot defence

How to Play Back Foot Defense

 

how to play back foot defence

how to play back foot defence

Step 1.
Bat lift

Step 2.
Step back with your back foot covering the line of the ball with your body.

Step 3.

Bring the bat down in line of the ball to make contact with the ball leaving no gap between bat and the body.
Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.



back foot drive

How to Play Back Foot Drive

This is an extension of the back foot defense. So the rules of back foot defense will apply to this shot as well.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.



back foot glance

How to Play Back Foot Glance

how to play back foot glance

how to play back foot glance

If you are a player who is strong on the leg side, this is a great shot to master to back your skills with sound technique.

If you can play this shot well, you’ll definitely pick up runs square and behind the wicket on the leg side.

The timing and control of the shot comes from the wrists.

A little flick at the moment of impact will close the face of the bat, helping the ball to the boundary.

You’ll need good balance when playing the shot, with your head over the ball.

It’s a great shot to play against opening bowlers because it relies on the ball coming onto the bat.

This again is an extension of the back foot defence

Step 1.
Bat lift

Step 2.
Step back with your back foot covering the line of the ball with your body.

Step 3.

Bring the bat down in line of the ball while rotating the wrist to guide the ball to the on side leaving no gap between bat and the body.



Late cut

How to Play Late Cut and Front Foot Cut

These shots are similar to each other, but one played on front foot and the other on the back foot.



Australia v Sri Lanka - Commonwealth Bank Series

How to Play Pull Shot

The pull shot is slightly an easier shot to play than the hook shot. But its important to follow the correct foot work with this shot. Wrong foot work can easily send the ball straight up in the air and get caught out.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.



hook shot

How to Play Hook Shot


Many wonder whats the difference between hook and the pull and consider they are the same shot. But they are very different to each other. Hook is played to a delivery that’s shoulder height or above and the pull is against waist height. Most important is the distinction in the footwork between the two shots. Watch carefully.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.



square cut

How to Play Square Cut


Now we are going to look at some of the shots that you can play square of the wicket. These shots are great scoring shots but involves a bit of risk in playing them as they are cross batted. Played correctly and played to perfection, they can get you to triple figures faster for sure.


Square Cut

Step 1.
Bat lift

Step 2.
Step to the side with your back foot covering the line of the ball.

Step 3.
Bring the bat down in line of the ball to make contact with the ball keeping the bat angled slightly down to send the ball down the ground. If you want to clear cover point fielder and go above his head, then have the bat slightly angled up. But its best to play down to be safe.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.



sweep

How to Play Sweep


This is a very useful shot to play against the spinners, specially if you want the players moved around. But its very important to have the length of the ball picked early and correctly for this shot to be executed properly.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.



reverse sweep

How to Play Reverse Sweep


This is the sweep shot played to the off side of the wicket in contrast to the conventional sweep. Slightly a difficult shot to play.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.



Leaving

Ducking and Leaving


All strokes we discussed before pretty much sums up all the main cricketing shots you can play to all corners of the ground. Master the art and the technique of these shots as shown here and it will get you that extra mile in your career. More importantly, you will look elegant and praise will come from those people who watch you bat. Cause a batsman with a great technique is quite pleasant in his stroke play to watch. So even if you get out for low scores on and off, people who watch you will still praise you for the entertainment you provided during your time at the crease. Its a great pleasure to hear such comments as a batsman and you would want to strive for more to be even better.

Now here are some ducking and leaving techniques to survive those nasty deliveries that might come your way.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to play this stroke technically correct.




in-out-swing1

How to Bowl Swing

In Swing

 

When the bowler delivers the ball, he angles the seam so that it points slightly to the leg side. To help achieve this position the bowling arm should be near vertical, brushing close to the ear. At release the wrist should remain cocked so as to help impart backspin along the orientation of the seam. The angle of the seam to the direction of motion pushes the ball to the leg side as the it moves through the air. This is enhanced by differential air pressure caused by movement of air over the rough and smooth surfaces, which also tends to push the ball to the leg side. The result is that the ball curves, or swings in to the batsman.

 

Out Swing

An out swinger is bowled by holding the ball with the seam at an angle and the first two fingers running along either side of the seam. Once the ball has worn and been polished so that one side is rougher than the other, the rough side is placed on the left (as seen from the bowler’s viewpoint). When the bowler delivers the ball, he angles the seam so that it points slightly to the left as well, and releases the ball rotating about a vertical axis with the seam along the rotational axis. The angle of the seam to the direction of motion pushes the ball to the left as the it moves through the air. This is enhanced by differential air pressure caused by movement of air over the rough and smooth surfaces, which also tends to push the ball to the left. The result is that the ball curves, or swings to the left.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to swing the ball.




off spin

How to Bowl Off Spin

Off spin is generally considered less difficult to play than leg spin, as off breaks typically spin less than leg breaks, and do not generally possess the same loopy, potentially deceptive flight. In addition, off spinners tend to have a smaller repertoire of deliveries to choose from. However, the off spinner often bowls faster and more accurately than a leg spinner, and can therefore deceive the batsman with changes in the pace of the ball.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to bowl off spin.




Saqlain Mushtaq

How to Bowl Doosra (for Off Spinners)

One of the greatest inventions in cricket in the recent past has been the Doosra, bowled by the off spinners. This was first introduced by one of the greatest off spinners the world has ever seen, none other Saqlain Mushtaq of Pakistan. Later this was mastered by Muttiah Muralitharan of Sri Lanka and Saeed Ajmal of Pakistan. Watch below a detailed explanation into bowling this delivery with the correct technique.

Hope this will help all you off spinners out there to add this to your repertoire.


SHANE WARNE(Australia) 08/05/93Cricketer

How to Bowl Leg Spin


As with all spinners, leg spinners bowl the ball far slower (70–90 km/h or 45-55 mph) than fast bowlers. The fastest leg spinners will sometimes top 100 km/h (60 mph). Leg spinners typically use variations of flight by sometimes looping the ball in the air, allowing any cross-breeze and the aerodynamic effects of the spinning ball to cause the ball to dip and drift before bouncing and spinning (usually called “turning”) sharply. While very difficult to bowl accurately, good leg spin is considered one of the most threatening types of bowling to bat against, since the flight and sharp turn make the ball’s movement extremely hard to read and the turn away from the batsman (assuming he or she is right-handed) is more dangerous than the turn into the batsman generated by an off spinner.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to bowl leg spin.



shane-warne-02

How to bowl variations in Leg Spin (with Shane Warne)

This is for all the youngsters trying to excel in their leg spin bowling. Watch below the greatest ever leg spinner, Shane Warne explaining how to bowl different variations in leg spin. It is possible to achieve the accuracy in these variations, provided that you put in the effort it requires to master it. Once you have the variety under your belt, its upto the batsman to take up the challenge. Watch carefully as Shane explains below.

 

 

Left Arm Spin

How to Bowl Left Arm Spin


Left-arm orthodox spin is a type of bowling in the sport of cricket. Left-arm orthodox spin is bowled by a left arm bowler using the fingers to spin the ball from right to left of the cricket pitch (from the bowler’s perspective). Left arm orthodox spin bowlers generally attempt to drift the ball in the air into a right-handed batsman, and then turn it away from the batsman (toward off-stump) upon landing on the pitch. The drift and turn in the air are attacking techniques. The major variations of a left arm spinner are the topspinner (which turns less and bounces higher in the cricket pitch), the arm ball (which does not turn at all, drifts into a right-handed batsman in the direction of the bowler’s arm movement; also called a ‘floater’) and the left-arm spinner’s version of a doosra (which turns the other way). The left-arm unorthodox spin like a leg break or leg spin is also a bowling action.

Watch the video below where late Bob Woolmer, the former South Africa and Pakistan coach explaining how to bowl left-arm spin.



wicket keeping

How to Keep Wicket

wicket keeping
Wicket keeping is a very important aspect of the game. If you have a bad keeper, you will be giving away free runs to the opposition behind the wicket. If you are a good keeper with bad technique, you will see yourself getting injured or hurt. So its very important to get the basics right while keeping as Ian Heally, one of the finest keepers the world has ever seen, explains it clearly below.

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